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Friday, April 24, 2009

Get a job with help from your handwriting

When you go for a job interview, or even when you are writing your resume and cover letter, do you know what your soft skills are? Do you know what personal qualities the employer is looking for?

Your writing can help.

You may think you know yourself pretty well, but by examining your handwriting you may find other gifts and strengths you hadn't thought of marketing for the job.

Here are some job applications for personality traits and how to identify them from writing.

The ability to concentrate well on the job in hand: shows in small writing.

Ability to sway others to your point of view with passion, feeling and persuasivieness: your writing will have a far right slant.

Ability to persuade others to your point of view using cool, analytical logic: your writing will be upright, with sharp V formations at the baseline.

Creative, imaginative, always coming up with new ideas: your writing will have large upper loops on l,k,f, h

Good at turning ideas into practicalities, making them work, taking action on them: your writing will show large lower loops on j,y,g,f

Clear thinking: your writing will have no "lead in" strokes on the letters. This traits is a two edged sword. It also means blunt and direct - so not appropriate if extreme diplomacy is required!

Well organized: you will have equally balanced top and bottom to your lower case "f"

Loyalty: you're i-dots will just be round dots, not drawn lines or shapes or jabs.

There are a great many more traits that can be found in handwriting that can help you get a job, or as an employer, help you hire the right person.

It obviously would not be a good idea to claim to the employer you have any particular quality because it shows in your handwriting!

So once you've identified the qualities you want the employer to know about, think back, and come up with real life, true stories of when you used these qualities, and have these ready to offer at the interview.

Here you can find many more traits the employers are looking for.

In tough times, it's the extra something you offer the employer that is likely to get you the job. Know yourself. Know what you can offer. And make sure you tell the employer about it, and the benefits it will bring to him (or her).

Thursday, April 9, 2009

Focus on the Positives

After I have finished a presentation to a group, people always come up and ask me to look at their writing, and I usually give them a 20 second analysis ... a few of the more obvious traits I can see.

I have been doing this for many years, so I know what I can "get away with" and what is not a good idea to mention in this public setting.

I give positive traits, and may give one of the negative traits I have found are acceptable to say.

For example, stubborn is generally considered a negative trait (although many very successful people are stubborn as mules!). Procrastination is another that no-one seems to mind being made public.

So I will list about a dozen or more traits, including one "cheeky" one, like stubborn or procrastiation.

The individual goes back to their friends, who ask "What did she tell you?"

You know what the first, and often the ONLY, thing they will answer?

Yes, you probably guessed it. They will repeat the negative trait, or which ever trait they most disliked hearing. Or, in some cases, the trait they thought should have been present but wasn't!

They are focusing on the negative.

If I don't offer a negative trait, people ASK for one. They are looking for it.

Don't focus on the negative, either in your writing or in your life.

Focus on the positives. Use the positives, nurture them, make them stronger.

What you focus on expands.

Focus on your negatives (again, either in your writing or in your life) and the negatives will expand and fill your life.

So, focus on the positives and watch what they can do to make your life happier and more fulfilling.

Would you like to know what your writing says about your?